Friday, November 21, 2014

Live Long & Prosper Newsletter November 2014

This newsletter was compiled from the latest research on health and longevity, by David Donohue, MD, FACP.

Nutrition
1.   Lack of health insurance increases all cause and all cancer mortality in adults: an analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) data.
   "There was a 70% increase in risk of all cause death and almost 300% of all cancer death for people without any health insurance coverage". We need to be mindful that those who lack health insurance are in that unfortunate state because of some root causes, which also impact mortality rate. Namely, they tend to be of lower socioeconomic status, and they tend to be sicker. Because that is how the health insurers earn large bonuses - keep sicker, more expensive patients off the books. Let's hope this improves with the Affordable Care Act.
October 23, 2013

2.   Meat consumption and diet quality and mortality in NHANES III.
   This large study found no association between consumption of red or processed meat with mortality. Men who ate more white meat were in a category that had lower overall mortality. For women, white meat was not correlated with mortality.
October 24, 2013

3.   Calcium intake and serum concentration in relation to risk of cardiovascular death in NHANES III.
   You might have read that calcium pills might increase your risk of a heart attack. This study, looking at 1 particular large data set, found no association. However it did find that women with highest levels of calcium (upper 5%) have almost double the risk of heart disease.
October 25, 2013

Exercise
1.   High-intensity interval training in patients with lifestyle-induced cardiometabolic disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
   High-intensity interval training "significantly increases CRF [Cardio-Respiratory Fitness] by almost double that of MICT [moderate-intensity continuous training] in patients with lifestyle-induced chronic diseases." So if you have high blood pressure, pre-diabetes, heart disease, then you might consider asking your doctor about switching from the occasional grind on the treadmill, to a program involving periods of high intensitiy activity. You will likely need to have a screening test to make sure your heart is up to it first though.
October 23, 2013

2.   Effect of increased fruit and vegetable consumption on physical function and muscle strength in older adults
   Since fruits and veggies are not protein sources, they might divert your diet from important protein sources (meat and dairy), right? This randomized trial showed that eating more fruits and veggies for 12 weeks actually increased grip strength, though the finding was not quite statistically significant. So we can infer at least that fruits and veggies do not make you weaker.
November 30, 2013

3.   Exercise: Putting Action into Our Epigenome.
   How do we prevent age-causing methylation of your genome? Exercise! "Six months of aerobic exercise alters whole-genome DNA methylation in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue"
October 29, 2013


Lifestyle
1.   Moderate Physical Activity as Predictor of Weight Loss After Bariatric Surgery
September 30, 2013

2.   Changes in fish consumption in midlife and the risk of coronary heart disease in men and women.
   "Our results suggest that increasing fish consumption to at least 2 servings per week in mid- or later life may lower CHD risk in women but not in men."
September 27, 2013

3.   Mortality among African American women with sarcoidosis: data from the Black Women's Health Study.
   Sarcoidosis kills. African American women with this disease have a 2.4 x risk of death compared with those who do not.
September 29, 2013

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Small Dermatology Procedures done in our Office!


Have a mole you're worried about?  Our physician assistants can take a look at it and remove it for you, if necessary.  Abbe Jackson, PA-C & Ashley Kontra, PA-C both had experience training in a dermatology office before starting at Progressive Health of Delaware.   Call us today if you have a mole you wanted checked!

Monday, November 3, 2014

High Dose Flu Vaccines Back in Stock

Our office did received some high dose flu vaccine last week and it's been going fast.  If you are over 65 years old, please come in soon for your high dose vaccine.  We have plenty of regular flu vaccines as well.  Stay healthy!

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Live Long & Prosper Newsletter October 2014

This newsletter was compiled from the latest research on health and longevity, by David Donohue, MD, FACP.

Nutrition
1.   Nutrition and Physical Activity Cancer Prevention Guidelines, Cancer Risk, and Mortality in the Women's Health Initiative.
   Women who followed of the American Cancer Society (ACS) Nutrition and Physical Activity Cancer Prevention Guidelines had 27% lower death rate (and 20% lower rate of death from cancer) than those who did not. What are those recommendations? The usual smattering: "Achieve and maintain a healthy weight throughout life. Be as lean as possible throughout life without being underweight. Avoid excess weight gain at all ages. For those who are overweight or obese, losing even a small amount of weight has health benefits and is a good place to start. Get regular physical activity and limit intake of high-calorie foods and drinks as keys to help maintain a healthy weight. Be physically active. Adults: Get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity each week (or a combination of these), preferably spread throughout the week. Children and teens: Get at least 1 hour of moderate or vigorous intensity activity each day, with vigorous activity on at least 3 days each week. Limit sedentary behavior such as sitting, lying down, watching TV, and other forms of screen-based entertainment. Doing some physical activity above usual activities, no matter what one’s level of activity, can have many health benefits. Eat a healthy diet, with an emphasis on plant foods. Choose foods and drinks in amounts that help you get to and maintain a healthy weight. Limit how much processed meat and red meat you eat. Eat at least 2½ cups of vegetables and fruits each day. Choose whole grains instead of refined grain products. If you drink alcohol, limit your intake. Drink no more than 1 drink per day for women or 2 per day for men."
January 10, 2014

2.   [Metformin, an antidiabetic molecule with anti-cancer properties].
   This study cites evidence that metformin might be cancer preventing. Who? Metformin is the first drug we reach for, when you get diabetes. It is also used in polycystic ovarian disease, in childhood obesity, and it is occasionally used in the prevention of diabetes. Stay tuned, but we might be using more of this drug.
January 17, 2014

3.   Social isolation and adult mortality: the role of chronic inflammation and sex differences.
   We know that people who are socially isolated have more health problems and die younger. This report cites some evidence that social isolation is also associated with some markers of inflammation. Not clear whether social isolation causes inflammation or vice versa.
January 25, 2014

Exercise
1.   Fatalities of pedestrians, bicycle riders, and motorists due to distracted driving motor vehicle crashes in the U.S., 2005-2010.
   True or false? "The era of smart phones has distracted drivers and made the roads less safe for cyclists and pedentrians." True. This study of US motorists found: "The rate of fatalities per 10 billion vehicle miles traveled increased from 116.1 in 2005 to 168.6 in 2010 for pedestrians and from 18.7 in 2005 to 24.6 in 2010 for bicyclists. Pedestrian victims of distracted driving crashes were disproportionately male, 25-64 years of age."
January 8, 2014

2.   Protective role of resting heart rate on all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality.
   Your doctor makes a big fuss about blood pressure. But who speaks for the ugly step-sister of vital signs, the heart rate? This study finally gives her day. People with resting heart rate under 60 beats per minute do in fact live longer than those with higher heart rates over 80 beats per minute.
January 28, 2014

3.   Exercise in the prevention and rehabilitation of breast cancer.
   " The relative risk reduction of breast cancer for women who engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity for 3-5 days peek week ranged between 20-40 %. Furthermore, several studies demonstrated a 24-67 % reduction in the risk of total deaths and 50-53 % reduction in the risk of breast cancer deaths in women who are physically active after breast cancer diagnosis compared with sedentary women."
February 6, 2014

Lifestyle
1.   Diet and cancer: Risk factors and epidemiological evidence.
   Based on epidemiologic evidence, "Moderate physical activity after breast cancer diagnosis contributes to 40% reduction of recurrence/disease-specific mortality".
January 1, 2014

2.   Type 2 diabetes and the risk of mortality among patients with prostate cancer
   "Type 2 diabetes was associated with a 23 % increased risk of prostate cancer mortality and a 25 % increased risk in all-cause mortality"
January 2, 2014

3.   DASH and Mediterranean-Type Dietary Patterns to Maintain Cognitive Health
   We have no pill for Alzheimer's Disease, no surgery for dementia. What can we do to prevent it? Regular exercise clearly benefits (both aerobic exercise and strength training). What about diet? This study reviews the literature and finds strong evidence that the DASH Diet, which is similar to the Mediterranean Diet in its emphasis on plant based nutrition, helps significantly.
January 4, 2014


Prevention
1.   Nutrition and Physical Activity Cancer Prevention Guidelines, Cancer Risk, and Mortality in the Women's Health Initiative.
   Women who followed of the American Cancer Society (ACS) Nutrition and Physical Activity Cancer Prevention Guidelines had 27% lower death rate (and 20% lower rate of death from cancer) than those who did not. What are those recommendations? The usual smattering: "Achieve and maintain a healthy weight throughout life. Be as lean as possible throughout life without being underweight. Avoid excess weight gain at all ages. For those who are overweight or obese, losing even a small amount of weight has health benefits and is a good place to start. Get regular physical activity and limit intake of high-calorie foods and drinks as keys to help maintain a healthy weight. Be physically active. Adults: Get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity each week (or a combination of these), preferably spread throughout the week. Children and teens: Get at least 1 hour of moderate or vigorous intensity activity each day, with vigorous activity on at least 3 days each week. Limit sedentary behavior such as sitting, lying down, watching TV, and other forms of screen-based entertainment. Doing some physical activity above usual activities, no matter what one’s level of activity, can have many health benefits. Eat a healthy diet, with an emphasis on plant foods. Choose foods and drinks in amounts that help you get to and maintain a healthy weight. Limit how much processed meat and red meat you eat. Eat at least 2½ cups of vegetables and fruits each day. Choose whole grains instead of refined grain products. If you drink alcohol, limit your intake. Drink no more than 1 drink per day for women or 2 per day for men."
January 10, 2014

2.   Exercise in the prevention and rehabilitation of breast cancer.
   " The relative risk reduction of breast cancer for women who engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity for 3-5 days peek week ranged between 20-40 %. Furthermore, several studies demonstrated a 24-67 % reduction in the risk of total deaths and 50-53 % reduction in the risk of breast cancer deaths in women who are physically active after breast cancer diagnosis compared with sedentary women."
February 6, 2014

3.   Eight ways to stay healthy after cancer: an evidence-based message.
   There are 12 million cancer survivors in the United States. I see them react in very different ways to a diagnosis of cancer. Naturally, some are irate and react with defiance, continuing to smoke for instance. This report is in line with the American Cancer Society guidelines. It recommends these measures to prolong life and happiness: '(1) don't smoke, (2) avoid secondhand smoke, (3) exercise regularly, (4) avoid weight gain, (5) eat a healthy diet, (6) drink alcohol in moderation, if at all, (7) stay connected with friends, family, and other survivors, (8) get screening tests and go to your regular checkups."
February 7, 2014

Safety
1.   Fatalities of pedestrians, bicycle riders, and motorists due to distracted driving motor vehicle crashes in the U.S., 2005-2010.
   True or false? "The era of smart phones has distracted drivers and made the roads less safe for cyclists and pedestrians." True. This study of US motorists found: "The rate of fatalities per 10 billion vehicle miles traveled increased from 116.1 in 2005 to 168.6 in 2010 for pedestrians and from 18.7 in 2005 to 24.6 in 2010 for bicyclists. Pedestrian victims of distracted driving crashes were disproportionately male, 25-64 years of age."
January 8, 2014

2.   14-year risk of all-cause mortality according to hypoglycaemic drug exposure in a general population.
   An interesting 14 year study of 3300 French diabetics. The researchers controlled for a host of confounding variables, and found that those who took insulin had a death rate almost 5X that of non-diabetics. Whereas those who took metformin along had a death rate of 2.3X relative to non-diabetics. Surprisingly, the best drugs were the sulfonylurea drugs, now out of vogue because or their risk for causing low blood sugar. Diabetics on these drugs had a relative risk of death of 1.7. That is they had only a 70% increased risk of death in any given year, relative to non-diabetics. Of course, who gets put on insulin? It is people with more severe diabetes.
April 23, 2014

Monday, October 13, 2014

Come Run a Charity 5K!

Progressive Health of Delaware is proud to be a sponsor for the HOPE 5K in Arden, DE on Saturday, October 25th at 9.00am.  Come run with Dr. Donohue, Dr. Zarek, and their kids as they support this worthy cause.  See more information about Premiere Charities at 

Temporarily Out of Flu Shots

We are currently out of the high dose flu vaccines for our patients 65 and older.  We expect them to be back in stock next week.  We will update our website when they have arrived.  We do have our regular flu shots available for our patients under 65.  See walk-in schedule on previous post.  Stay well!

Monday, September 22, 2014

Walk in for flu shot!

Our flu clinics are Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9-12 and from 4-5pm. No appointment necessary!

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